Coronavirus UK LIVE: Fears for Turkey, Croatia and Greece holidays as self-employed second grant applications open TODAY

CROATIA, Turkey and Greece could join France on the UK's quarantine list as Covid-19 cases in the countries continue to rise.

The popular holiday destinations have seen a rise in cases and could be the latest to be placed on the quarantine list.

It comes just days after many holidaymakers scrambled to return to the UK from France, Malta and the Netherlands.

Should Croatia, Turkey and Greece join other countries like Spain and Belgium on the list, those returning will need to quarantine for 14 days.

Meanwhile, self-employed workers can apply for a second emergency coronavirus grant worth up to £6,570 from today.

The cash is to help those who work for themselves if their income has been negatively impacted by the effect of the pandemic.

The coronavirus death toll rose by five in the UK on Sunday, with total fatalities numbering 41,366.

Follow our coronavirus live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • FRANCE SENDING RIOT POLICE TO ENFORCE MASK WEARING

    The French government is sending riot police to the Marseille region to help enforce mask requirements, as more and more towns and neighborhoods are imposing mask rules starting today to slow rising infections.

    Government spokesman Gabriel Attal announced that 130 police officers are being sent to the Marseille region, which expanded its outdoor mask requirements to all farmers markets and more neighborhoods Friday.

    France has seen scattered incidents of violence by people refusing to wear masks.

    Paris expanded its mask requirements Saturday, and other towns around France started requiring masks outdoors on Monday.

    Infections have been speeding up around France in recent days, with 3,015 new cases Sunday, one of the highest daily spikes since the country lifted a strict two-month lockdown in May.

    More than 30,400 people have died with the virus in France, one of the highest death tolls in the world.

  • MORDAUNT PUTS PRESSURE ON GOVERNMENT

    Paymaster General and Cabinet Office minister Penny Mordaunt said she was “seeking a further meeting today” with the Department for Education after speaking with students and parents about exam results.

    “I will be supporting colleges in their appeals, working to ensure those who have the grades on appeal can go to uni this year if that is what they want,” she tweeted.

    “This group of young people have lost out on so much already, we must ensure that bright, capable students can progress on their next step. Delaying a year won't be an option, and it shouldn't be an option. For many it will mean falling out of education.”

    Ms Mordaunt added: “I have also made my views on GCSE results known to DfE. Will be posting updates later today.”

  • OFFICERS IN LONDON BREAK UP 200 PARTIES IN SINGLE WEEKEND

    A senior Met officer today pledged to clampdown on illegal raves after revealing that police were called to break up 200 parties in a single weekend.

    Commander Ade Adelekan said more than 1,000 unlicensed lockdown events have been held in London since June.

    Mr Adelekan told the London Evening Standard: “I make no apology for the Met’s exhaustive efforts to shut down the dangerous and exploitative unlicensed music events which we have seen across London. Since the end of June, the Met has responded to more than 1,000 events.

    “To an outsider these events may appear harmless, but they are not.

    “We know that gangs have used the crowds to disguise drug dealing or worse, to settle scores with rivals.”

  • TORY MP – 'CLEAR INJUSTICE' ON EXAM RESULTS

  • HANCOCK – 100,000 HAVE SIGNED UP FOR FUTURE COVID TRIALS

    Health Secretary Matt Hancock said 100,000 people have signed up for future coronavirus vaccine trials through the NHS.

  • BLAIR – PEOPLE SHOULD PRESENT “BIO-IDS”

    Tony Blair said he does not see how international travel can resume again without “regular testing” and that individuals should have bio-IDs to present the coronavirus tests they have had.

    He told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: “If you're not able to test significantly when you're trying to get large numbers of people back into a normal routine, then I think you're going to be enormously inhibited at how you handle the disease. And it's not so difficult to do.”

    Mr Blair added: “We suggest how you might boost and accelerate the development of these on-the-spot antigen tests and then we say at a certain stage you want to move to a … every person has, as it were, a record of what tests they've had, if you like a kind of bio-ID which allows them then to present, for example, when you're travelling – I just don't see how you get international travel going again unless you've got regular testing.”

  • BLAIR: MASS TESTING NEEDED

    Former prime minister Tony Blair has called for the Government to roll out mass testing for Covid-19 before the end of 2020.

    Speaking on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, Mr Blair said: “If 70% of the cases are asymptomatic, you are not testing those people, they are all false negatives at the moment.

    “The people out there who have got the disease but have got no symptoms yet can still spread the disease are in effect a false negative.

    “So, yes, it is true that you will miss some people…this is where I think the Government has got to change the way it calculates risk. In every single aspect of this, once you realise you're not going to eradicate the disease, you're going to have to contain it and live with it at least until a vaccine comes, then you've just got to have a sensible risk calculus in every area.

    “So, for example, now we're telling people to go back into pubs, we're incentivising, quite rightly for the purposes of getting the economy moving, to go and eat out. All of those things are risks.

    “I think the way we're doing the quarantine rules is wrong actually. I think you could cut that 14-day quarantine substantially if you recognise that whatever you do there is going to be a risk, you just have to minimise it.”

  • 'GAVIN WILLIAMSON HAS LOST THE DRESSING ROOM'

    So says former head of Ofsted Sir Michael Wilshaw.

    Sir Michael told BBC Radio 4's Today programme that the situation regarding A-level results has been “a terrible farce”.

    He added: “There has to be political responsibility, like all things at the end of the day, and somebody has to carry the can, the politicians, the political leaders have to carry the can.

    “And the great danger for Gavin Williamson at the moment is that he is losing confidence, he is losing the confidence of headteachers around the country who have seen this happen.

    “He hasn't exactly covered himself in glory over the pandemic period with all sorts of changes of direction – saying that primary schools would be open when they obviously couldn't be under the social distancing rules, saying every poor child would receive a laptop and obviously that didn't happen, the school meals voucher system wasn't working.

    “And so he's losing the dressing room, if you like. Headteachers have got to feel confident that they are being well-led by the Department for Education who are holding this agency, Ofqual, to account.”

  • GRAMMAR SCHOOL HEAD – 85 PER CENT OF PUPILS' RESULTS DOWNGRADED

    Grammar school headteacher Kay Mountfield said schools like hers have seen “85% of their student cohort downgraded”.

    The head of Sir William Borlase's Grammar School in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, told BBC Radio 4's Today programme: “Only 38 students out of 220 have kept their grades. Eighteen were downgraded by three grades, 74 by two grades and they're scrabbling about for university places that just aren't there.

    “Seventy of my students have not had their first choice of university – normally that would be about five, or 10 maybe, students. But I have 70 grammar school students, from a range of backgrounds, who have worked very hard for their grades, struggling to get into universities.”

  • VIRUS SPIKE AT CHURCH IN SOUTH KOREA

    A South Korean pastor who has been a critic of the country's president has tested positive for the coronavirus, two days after he participated in an anti-government rally in Seoul that drew thousands.

    More than 300 virus cases have been linked to the Rev. Jun Kwang-hun's huge church in northern Seoul, which has emerged as a major cluster of infections.

    Health workers have so far linked 319 infections to Jun's church after carrying out tests on about 2,000 of its 4,000 members.

    Police are tracking down around 700 church members who remain out of contact.

  • NORTHERN IRELAND GCSE RESULTS 'WILL BE BASED ON TEACHER PREDICTIONS'

    Northern Ireland's Education Minister Peter Weir has said GCSE results will be based on grades provided by teachers.

    It follows controversy last week after more than a third of A Level and AS Level grades provided by schools were lowered by the exams board CCEA.

  • FABRICANT – 'COMPUTER SHOULD CRUNCH THE NUMBERS AGAIN'

  • DUNCAN SMITH – 'NO ALGORITHM IS GOING TO SORT OUT PROBLEM OUT'

    Former Tory leader Sir Iain Duncan Smith said the algorithm-awarded A-level grades should be abandoned, with teacher assessments or mocks used instead.

    He told LBC Radio: “No algorithm is going to sort our problem out, it's a human issue.”

    He said concerns about “grade inflation” could be dealt with by accepting that 2020 would not be used as a benchmark for future years because some of the grades would have been “overcooked” by teachers.

    He said: “I think we're left with the very simple position we have to go pretty much with the assessments or the mocks – and/or the mocks, you could do both depending when the assessments were done – and then get it over and done with.

    “The idea that you have an algorithm to figure out what they might have done in an exam is really impossible and I think that's where the big mistakes will be made.”

  • VACCINE UPDATE

  • BURNHAM TAKING 'LEGAL ADVICE' OVER EXAM SHAMBLES

  • PM FACES CALLS TO INTERVENE TO END A-LEVELS CRISIS

    Boris Johnson is under pressure to intervene to end the deepening A-levels crisis in England, amid growing anger among pupils and teachers and warnings of unrest among Tory MPs.

    Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer called on the Prime Minister to take “personal responsibility” for fixing the issue, accusing him of having been “invisible” throughout the turmoil.

    The Conservative former education secretary Lord Baker of Dorking urged ministers to delay the publication of GCSE results, due this week, until the problems with A-levels had been resolved.

    Mr Johnson had been expected to be in Scotland this week on a camping holiday with his fiancee, Carrie Symonds, and their baby son Wilfred.

    But with Labour demanding he hold a press conference to explain how he intends to right the “historic injustice” suffered by pupils who had had their grades marked down, Downing Street was unable to say whether the trip would go ahead.

    Gavin Williamson last week gave a “triple-lock” commitment that pupils could use the highest result out of their teacher's predicted grade, their mock exam, or sitting an actual exam in the autumn.

    In a further setback for the Education Secretary, The Daily Telegraph reported that some members of the Ofqual board now wanted to ditch the system for “moderating” the predicted grades awarded by teachers so results are standardised across the country.

  • RUSSIA REPORTS NEARLY 5,000 NEW COVID CASES

    Russia reported 4,892 new cases of coronavirus on Monday, pushing its tally so far to 927,745, the fourth largest in the world.

  • THIRD OF WORKERS NOT EXPECTING OFFICE RETURN UNTIL AT LEAST NEXT YEAR

    One in three British workers does not think they will not be back in their office or other workplace until at least next year, according to a new survey.

    Twenty-five per cent of staff said they expect to return to their place of work in 2021, while 8% said they are likely to work from home indefinitely.

    Many Britons, especially those with office jobs, switched to working from spare rooms and kitchen tables across the country when the coronavirus pandemic forced the country into lockdown earlier this year.

    But 45% of the 4,001 workers polled by YouGov said they expect to be back in the office before the end of December.

    Just over a fifth of employees were unsure when they would return.

  • WEDDING RECEPTIONS BROKEN UP BY POLICE FOR CORONAVIRUS BREACHES

    Police broke up wedding receptions at the weekend after they were found to be breaching coronavirus restrictions.

    Officers in Blackburn found more than 100 guests attending a reception on Sunday evening, while in Greater Manchester a fixed penalty notice was issued to the organiser of a wedding with more than 50 guests and a marquee.

    Both areas are subject to local restrictions to prevent people socialising with other households.

    In a Facebook post, Blackburn and Darwen Police said officers engaged with those attending the wedding reception and the gathering was dispersed without further issue.

    The post said: “This is a clear breach of both local and national restrictions that puts everyone attending at risk.”

    The wedding in Whalley Range, Manchester, was one of 54 reported coronavirus breaches between 3pm and 11pm on Sunday in Greater Manchester, police said.

  • NEW SOUTH WALES CHANGES IN SCHOOLS

    Formals, dances, graduation ceremonies, choirs and all social events have been banned in New South Wales government schools to try and stop the spread of coronavirus.

    A string of school closureshas prompted the NSW education department to announce new Covid-safe rules.

    Anyone with symptoms of Covid-19 is prohibited from returning to school until a negative test result has been reported.

  • CALIFORNIA CASES RISE BY 4,841

    California's coronavirus cases have jumped by at least 4,841 on Sunday to 625,057, according to Reuters.

  • NEW ZEALAND DELAYS ELECTION

    New Zealand has delayed its election by four weeks amid a new outbreak of coronavirus in the country.

    The election, originally scheduled for September 19, will now take place on October 17, prime minister Jacinda Ardern announced.

    Last week saw New Zealand reimpose a lockdown on its most populous city, Auckland, after a cluster of new coronavirus cases were identified.

    The cases were the first diagnosed in the country in more than 100 days.

    In a statement, Ardern said: “Clearly as a government our current priority is getting the Covid outbreak under control and removing restrictions on New Zealanders as soon as possible.

    “It is clear that the reemergence of Covid in Auckland at the beginning of the formal campaign period has been cause for concern.”

    She added that she does not intend to delay the election any further than October 17.

  • INDIA SEES 961 NEW DEATHS

    India has recorded 961 new coronavirus deaths, bringing its total toll to 51,045.

    The country is now consistently seeing between 900 and 1,000 deaths per day – the highest daily toll in the world.

    The second-highest tally in the world in the last 24 hours was in Mexico, which saw 635 new deaths.

    Lockdowns remain in place for much of India's 1.3billion population, although some states are beginning the process of lifting restrictions.

  • SOUTH KOREA FILES COMPLAINT AGAINST PASTOR

    The South Korean health ministry has filed a complaint against a pastor at a church thought to be the source of a new outbreak of coronavirus cases in the country.

    Sunday saw cases in the country jump 279, the biggest single-day rise in five months.

    The cases have been linked to the Sarang Jeil Church in Seoul, whose pastor, Reverend Jun Kwang-hoon, has been accused of “obstructing” an investigation into the outbreak.

    Jun is said to have refused to provide a complete list of church members or to cooperate with efforts to track and trace those who could've been exposed to the virus.

    Some 240 people linked to the church have tested positive so far.

  • FIFTH PUPIL TESTS POSITIVE IN LANARKSHIRE

    A fifth pupil has tested positive for the coronavirus amid a small outbreak in Lanarkshire.

    Seven others cases have been confirmed in the county, including pupils from two other schools.

    The latest case is a pupil from Calverdale High School in Airdrie.

    The pupil is reported to have been to school on Thursday, but officials have said they do not believe the virus is being transmitted at the school and that it will not be closed down.

    Transmission is thought to be occurring at indoor social events.

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